News & events

Historische parel ontdekt bij Cinematek: anti-nazifilm uit 1934

20/09/2013

Cinematek, the Royal Belgian Film Archive in Brussels, has discovered a historic gem in its archive: an anti-Nazi film from 1934, a globally unique piece. The documentary film 'Hitler's reign of terror' was shot in Germany in 1933 by Cornelius Vanderbilt, a wealthy American amateur filmmaker. How it ended up in Belgium, could be explained by the sudden German invasion, perhaps just at the moment that the picture would be distributed in our country.

Over the past 60 years the film was considered lost. The Americans were aware of the existence of the film, but only a few people have ever seen it. On October 26th 2013 a restored copy will be screened at the MoMa in New York, according to a  RTBF report. The film contains black and white images of the Germans celebrating the victory of Hitler in 1933. Vanderbilt was the only American who was in Berlin on that election day.

Vanderbilt also interviewed Hitler, but was not allowed to shoot images of that interview. However, a "reenactment" of his conversation with Hitler can be seen in the film. Vanderbilt was one of the few people who were able to film freely in Germany during that period. "In 1935 or 1936 no one would be allowed to do this anymore" says historian Roel Vande Winkel on RTBF. "But apparently at the time he was able make those images."

Vanderbilt also interviewed Hitler, but was not allowed to shoot images of that interview. However, a "reenactment" of his conversation with Hitler can be seen in the film. Vanderbilt was one of the few people who were able to film freely in Germany during that period. "In 1935 or 1936 no one would be allowed to do this anymore" says historian Roel Vande Winkel on RTBF. "But apparently at the time he was able make those images."


Have a look at the RTBF report (in French).

(Bron: Rtbf.be / Deredactie.be)